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Mission Accomplished 2014

 
On May 22, 2011, an EF5 tornado tore through Joplin and Duquesne, Missouri, leaving a 13-mile path of destruction. The tornado damaged or destroyed more than one third of the city, including thousands of homes and businesses and half of the school district. Most tragic, 161 lives were lost, including 7 Joplin Schools' students and 1 staff member. On Sept. 2, 2014, a three-year journey to build back bigger, better, and safer schools came to an end with the opening of Joplin High School/Franklin Technology Center. The new school is home to more than 2,200 students who have been attending classes at three temporary facilities since the disaster. 

JHS/FTC - Your Next Generation High School

JHS entrance Within weeks of the devastating storm that destroyed both Joplin High School and Franklin Technology Center and three other schools, a team made up of staff, students, parents, community members, business leaders, and education experts came together to plan for the new high school and technical school. From these "dream" sessions, a new vision for education in Joplin began to emerge: a comprehensive college, career, and technology focused high school designed to prepare students for a successful life through relevant, real-word experiences. Learn more.
 
The new school features design elements throughout the space to support this education philosophy:  
 
 
Designed with a college, career, and technology focus:
  • Flexible and collaborative learning spaces throughout the campus
  • Windows and glass throughout the building emphasize "learning on display" and allow students to experience various career paths
  • Outdoor courtyards designed to accommodate specialized learning activities and support adjacent classroom halls
  • Student-run TV station / production area
  • Student-run coffee shop and spirit store
  • Student-run greenhouse 
  • 66-seat, student-run restaurant
  • Art gallery to showcase student artwork
Designed to encourage student, parent, and community engagement:
  • 1,250-seat auditorium
  • Black box theater with indoor/outdoor seating
  • Choir, band, and orchestra rehearsal halls with sound-isolating practice rooms
  • Historic features from the original high school: rose garden, rock, brick eagle
  • 2,500-seat gymnasium and two auxiliary gymnasiums
  • Expanded athletic complex that includes indoor running track, tennis courts, and practice/competition fields for football, band, soccer, baseball, and softball
  • Fields feature synthetic turf for reduced ongoing maintenance costs and lighting to allow for evening practices and games
Designed for safety and efficiency
  • Four student/staff safe rooms and one community safe room provide shelter during severe weather
  • Finishes and materials that decrease ongoing maintenance costs
  • Energy efficiencies such as hydronic HVAC system, LED lighting, rain water harvesting for irrigation, and window placement to maximize natural light

Quick Facts

  • Grades served: 9-12
  • Capacity: 2,500+ students
  • Site area: 66 acres
  • Building area: 487,937 sq. ft.
  • Estimated project cost: $121.5 million
  • Architect: Corner Greer & Associates, Inc. / DLR Group
 

Helpful Information

  • Square footage of destroyed JHS: 232,632
  • Square footage of destroyed FTC: 70,000

College, Career, and Technology Focused

JHS/FTC
 
The new Joplin High School and Franklin Technology Center combines a comprehensive high school and career education center into one building where the focus is on each individual student’s education and career interests.
 
 
 
 
 
Think Tank
 
The facility is designed to support 21st century learning, which focuses on collaborative work, experienced-based study, inquiry-based problem solving, real-world application, and student-led study.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Arts Courtyard
 
The school features flexible spaces for students and staff, several indoor and outdoor areas that encourage social interaction, and amenities that support increased parent and community engagement.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eagle Alley
 
Students attending the school can choose from an expanded selection of classes clustered within five career paths. These include numerous college dual credit and Advanced Placement courses and personalized learning experiences. Within these classes, students can participate in real-world work environments, such as the student-run spirit store, coffee shop, restaurant, greenhouse, TV station, and more.